It’s Official: Maryland Court of Special Appeals process now includes mediation
Mediation is now a formal part of the appellate process. What does that mean?

Mala Malhotra-Ortiz, Esq., director of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), and Tara Lehner, deputy director of ADR, Court of Special Appeals, answered some questions about what mediation is, how the program works, and how it helps the people involved in disputes at the appellate level.

Q. What is ADR? 
Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is an umbrella term used to describe processes that people use to resolve conflicts without going through formal litigation. 

Q. What ADR services does the Court of Special Appeals provide? 

COSA ADR Team
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals ADR Office Includes
(left to right):Jay B. Knight, Tara Lehner, Mala Malhotra-Ortiz,
and Holly Slack
PHOTO LYNNE SADLER, MARYLAND JUDICIARY

Q. What kinds of cases are eligible for mediation in the Court of Special Appeals? 
Approximately 1,300 civil appeals are filed in the Court of Special Appeals each year, and most of these civil appeals are screened to assess whether they are appropriate for mediation or prehearing conference. The ADR office will consider scheduling a mediation or a prehearing conference in cases that are not automatically screened if it is requested by the parties or their attorneys. 

Appeals that are not automatically screened for mediation include: 

Q. Why is mediation part of the appeals process? How does it benefit the people involved in the disputes? 
Mediation can: 

Q. How do I get more information?
Parties interested in mediation or a prehearing conference at the Court of Special Appeals may contact the COSA ADR Office at 410-260-3717. For more information about the program and to view our brochure please visit: